The success of 'Fun with Radio'
quickly led to the appearance of
the other 'Fun with . . .' titles. Other 'Fun with . . .' Books
The success of Fun with Radio quickly led to the appearance of the other Fun with . . . titles, as listed below, covering every aspect of the radio hobby.   The flow of new titles and revised editions embracing new topics and techniques continued until 1981.   It is surely no coincidence that this flow ceased upon the death of Davey's Editor, Jack Cox, in that year.


Welcome and introduction,
contact details, disclaimer,
rights notice, BVWS link,
site map.
The man who introduced radio
construction to several generations
of boys, many of whom became radio
or communications professionals.
The history of the famous
one-valve circuit, 1948-78.
The Studio 'E' 1-valver and
the Focus Transistor radio:
downloads for these famous
designs, and lots more!
A growing resource for those who
built Davey designs years ago, or who
simply wish to know more about them.
Davey's forgotten pre-war writing for
Practical Wireless and other journals.
Downloads for seven pre-war articles.
The Boy's Own Paper - a
complete listing of Davey's
designs and articles.
Davey's articles in the
compendium books produced 
by BOP's Editor, Jack Cox.
Davey's most well-known book,
which ran to six editions.
(This page)
The other titles introduced young constructors to
every aspect of the radio and electronics hobby.
Davey sets built by contributors -
including designs that could have been
lost but for some prolonged detective work.
Two home-made coils to use in place of the all-too-scarce
commercial types, suppliers for other components, and
other sources of useful information.
Latest news, links to other sites of interest,
and news archive.
Hover your mouse over the
navigation buttons above for
brief page contents.
Pages marked  >  give access to
one or more subsidiary pages -
see also Site Map at bottom
of WELCOME page.
It is surely no coincidence that the
flow of new titles and revised editions
ceased upon the death of Jack Cox.
    Cover of Fun with Silicon Chips
    in Modern Radio
, 1981.

    Site author's image.
    Other rights may subsist.

For the more advanced designs in these books, detailed practical wiring layouts are not always given.   Davey saw them as having limited value given differences in the possible choice of components, and maintained that builders of advanced sets should derive wiring layouts from circuit diagrams and adopt good practice to avoid instability.   This applies especially for the designs in Fun with Short Waves/Short Wave Radio, where small wiring differences between sets built to ostensibly the same design could lead to vastly different performance.

The contents of these books are summarised here.   Use the links below to get quickly down to the detailed chapter lists.

Fun with Short Waves / Short Wave Radio
A variety of valve and transistor short-wave designs for battery and mains (no transistor designs in the first edition).   Chapters on short-wave practice and communications receivers.

Fun with Electronics
A little more theory offered than in most of the Fun with . . . series.   Beginner's one-valver version.   Chapters on amplifiers, loudspeakers, record players and tape recording.   Chapter on the impact of electronics upon modern life.

Fun with Transistors
A variety of transistor designs including short-wave and superhet receivers, and transistor amplifiers.

Fun with Hi-Fi
Chapters on the history of hi-fi, the Mullard amplifiers, record decks, tuners, amplifiers, loudspeakers, and ideas for self-build hi-fi.   A book for the teenage-to-adult enthusiast with a slightly deeper pocket.

Fun with Silicon Chips in Modern Radio
Introduction to silicon technology, designs for medium-wave receivers and amplifiers, kits, loudspeakers.

Before using the list, please read the caution and usage notes on this section's introductory page.

    Fun with Short Waves / Short Wave Radio, 1st edition: Edmund Ward Ltd; 2nd & 3rd editions: Kaye & Ward Ltd.
Edition:   Chapter/design: Construction and key components:
Coils: A = aerial winding;
          MW = medium wave winding;
          LW = long wave winding;
          SW = short wave winding;
          R = reaction or reflex winding


1960
Fun with Short Waves

1st edition
  Appearing only three years after the first edition of Fun with Radio, the much sought-after first edition (Fun with Short Waves), is vintage Davey - with every design valve-based, including several battery one-valvers.
    Foreword by Jack Cox -
    Relates Davey's spell in Berlin at the end of World War 2,
    when he made amateur short-wave transmissions.
-



    1: Introduction to Short Waves -
    Changes over years in definition of "short waves";
    wavelength-frequency relationship; variations in propagation
    conditions with frequency, solar activity and time of day;
    country prefixes; time zones; tools; circuit symbols;
    resistor colour code; recommended books.
-






    2: A Battery One-Valve Receiver -
    General construction and usage hints given throughout chapter.





3-ply or hardboard chassis, slotted floor,
with front panel, foil-covered;
Osmor SWQ1 and SWQ2 (each A, SW band, R) -
switching shown in practical layout;
1.4-volt pentode, e.g.
DF91, DF92, DF96, 1T4, 1F1, 1F2; headphones.
    3: More Battery One-Valve Receivers -
    Three designs using 6.3-volt valves, heaters powered by
    "lantern" battery, all built on slotted chassis as Chap. 2.
    Using 6J7 or 6K7:


    Using EBC33 or 6Q7:


    Using ECC83 or 12AX7:







Osmor SWQ1 and SWQ2 (each A, SW band, R) -
switched as Chap. 2;
6J7 or 6K7 (Octal); headphones.
Osmor SQ2 only, or SWQ1 and SWQ2 (each A, SW band, R) -
switched as Chap. 2;
EBC33 or 6Q7 (Octal), triode section; headphones.
Osmor SQ2 only, or SWQ1 and SWQ2 (each A, SW band, R) -
switched as Chap. 2;
ECC83 or 12AX7 (B9A), heater centre-tapped, worked on 6 or 12v,
2nd triode section as AF amp; headphones.
    4: Making a Two-Valve Short-Wave Receiver -
    (Detector, AF amp)
    See YOUR DAVEY SETS
    for a recently-built version.



3-ply or hardboard chassis, slotted floor,
with front panel, foil-covered;
Osmor SWQ1 and SWQ2 (each A, SW band, R);
1.4-volt pentodes, e.g. DL94, DL96, 3S4, 3V4, 1P1;
headphones, or output trans. to speaker, with alternative
of phones from anode to ground via blocking capacitor.
    5: The Three-Valve Short-Wave Receiver -
    Use of RF stage before detector stage for receiving Morse
    (set oscillating).
    Two designs using RF, detector and AF stages.
    Davey presents the first for interest only, as it has an
    unselective first stage, and advises readers to pass
    to second design, which uses ganged tuning of RF and
    detector stages:












Outline layout only, implies metal chassis;
RF stage: Osmor SWQ1 and/or SWQ2 (each A, SW band);
Detector: Osmor SWQ1 and/or SWQ2 (each pri, sec, R)
SW choke;
DF91/92/96, DF91/92/96, 1.4v audio pentode; headphones.
    6: Operating from the Mains and Setting up a Station -
    Differences between battery and mains sets, including low
    background noise (battery) versus low running costs (mains).
    Mains power supply, 250v 70mA HT, 6.3v 3A LT,
    with potential divider for battery valves:

    Southern Technical Supplies power pack,
    275v 70mA HT, 6.3v 2A LT, plus smoothing:
    Simple Two-Valve Mains Amplifier:
    Two-Valve Amplifier with optional neg. feedback:
    Advantages of using good loudspeaker discussed.



Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Transformer, 250-0-250v 70mA, 5v 2A, 6.3v 3A;
2 chokes 70mA; 5Z4.
Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Southern Tech. Supplies "Power Pak" type B, choke 70mA.
EF41, EL41 (or EL84); output transformer; speaker.
6J7, 6V6; output transformer; speaker.


    7: Building a Three-Valve All-Mains Receiver -
    Other ways of receiving morse, including superhet and BFO.
    Three-valver (RF, detector, AF), supplied by
    power pack from Chap. 6:










Outline layout only, metal chassis and front panel, with
under-chassis screen between RF and detector stages;
RF stage: Osmor SWQ1 and/or SWQ2 (each A, SW band);
Detector: Osmor SWQ1 and/or SWQ2 (each pri, sec, R);
2 x RF choke (short-wave);
EF50, EF50, 6V6, or 6J7, 6J7, 6V6, or EF41, EF40, EL41;
output transformer, speaker.
    8: Three-Valve Feeder for an Amplifier -
    2 RF stages + detector, with ganged tuning of all
    three stages, supplied by power pack from Chap. 6:









Outline layout only, metal tray chassis (deep front-to-back),
with under-chassis screen between each stage;
Coil (unspecified), RF stage 1: (A, SW band);
Coil (unspecified), RF stage 2: (pri, sec);
Coil (unspecified) detector: (pri, sec, R);
RF choke (short-wave);
EF50, EF50, EF50 (B9G).
    9: Superhet Converters -
    Advantages of superhet operation.
    Three designs for simple superhet "front ends" producing IF
    signals for applying to aerial terminal of broadcast set.  
    The first design below depends upon a detector-with-reaction
    stage oscillating continuously, albeit gently!   Comments
    welcome on advisability of using a setup like this.

    One-Valve Short-Wave Superhet Converter:

    Battery Two-Valve Superhet Converter:

    Mains (-powered) Converter for Use in Front of TRF Receiver:









Osmor SWQ1 and/or SWQ2 (A, SW band, R);
RF choke (all-wave); RF choke (SW); DF91.
Osmor SWQ1 and/or SWQ2 (A, SW band, R);
2 x RF choke (SW), RF choke (all-wave); DF91, DF91.
Denco coils, Yellow Nos 3, 4, or 5;
RF choke (SW); RF choke (all-wave); 6K8.
    10: An Easy-to-Build Short-Wave Superhet Receiver -
    RSGB "Simple Receiver for the Beginner" mentioned.
    Five-Valve Superhet Receiver:








    BFO unit to add to above:
    Suggestions for introducing feedback as alternative to BFO.


Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Metal chassis, with screening between aerial and osc. coils;
Aerial coils: Osmor QA2, QA3, QA4;
Osc coil: Osmor QO2, QO3, QO4;
2 x IFT: Osmor 465kHz, pre-aligned, or 455kHz if to match BFO;
6K8, 6K7, 6J7, 6V6, 5Z4;
output transformer, speaker;
mains transformer 250-0-250v 80mA, 5v 1A, 6.3v 2A;
smoothing choke.
Eddystone BFO coil, 455kHz; 6J7.


    11: Aerials and Earths for Short Waves -
    TV aerials as examples of half-wave dipoles.
    Useful short-wave aerial lengths; aerials for restricted
    spaces; earthing methods; warning not to earth to gas pipe.
-




    12: Very High Frequency FM Designs -
    BBC VHF/FM service summarised; FM receiver
    kits and alignment services for home constructors:
    Osmor Mini-magic - circuit shown.
    Cossor Model 701K - circuit shown.   Non-isolated power supply.
    (A note reveals that this kit was unfortunately withdrawn from
    the market as the book went to press.)
-







    13: Amateur Radio -
    The RSGB - history and what it offers;
    PMG licence for transmitting; short-wave bands -
    uses and characteristics; reception report codes;
    international Q code; abbreviations; Morse code.
-





    14: Commercial Receivers, Kits of Parts, and Buying Components -
    R1155 receiver; HAC short-wave kits;
    Cossor test gear; receivers by Eddystone and others.
-



    Appendix: Buying Components -
    Disappearance of component shops except in London's West End;
    mail order from suppliers advertising in technical press;
    Addresses of suppliers (now obsolete).
 
-
1968
Fun with Short Wave Radio

2nd edition - note name change
  For the second edition, several chapters from the first edition were dropped, notably those on superhet converters and VHF/FM receivers.   New or revised chapters introduced transistor designs.   Chapter order was revised to enable the "Amateur Radio" chapter to follow on from the introductory chapter.   Similar chapter titles or designs thus appear under different numbering than in the first edition.

    Editor's Note:
    Jack Cox repeats account of Davey's operation of
    a short-wave transmitter in post-war Berlin.
-



    Symbols and Abbreviations
-
    1: Introduction to Short Waves -
    Development of transistors for HF work noted;
    Changes over years in definition of "short waves";
    wavelength-frequency relationship; variations in propagation
    conditions with frequency, solar activity and time of day;
    country prefixes; time zones; tools; recommended books.
-






    2: Amateur Radio -
    The RSGB - history and what it offers;
    PMG licence for transmitting; short-wave bands -
    uses and characteristics; reception report codes;
    international Q code; abbreviations; Morse code.
-





    3: A Battery One-Valve Receiver -
    General construction and usage hints given throughout chapter.


    (As Chap. 2, 1st edition, but coil connections re-drawn.)
3-ply or hardboard chassis, slotted floor,
with front panel, foil-covered;
Osmor SWQ1 and SWQ2 (each A, SW band, R), switched;
1.4-volt pentode, e.g.
DF91, DF92, DF96, 1T4, 1F1, 1F2; headphones.
    4: Battery Valve and Transistor Receivers -
    1-valver using 6.3-volt valve, heater powered by "lantern"
    battery (similar to design a) in Chap. 3, 1st edition.):


    Battery (valve) amplifier:

    Transistor Experimental Receiver:





Slotted chassis as Chap. 3;
Osmor SWQ1 and SWQ2 (each A, SW band, R) switched as Chap. 3;
6J7 or 6J7G (Octal), or EF80 or EF85 or EF89 (B9A); headphones.
Built on to chassis of set a);
DL96 with separate LT supply; headphones.
No layout drawing;
Osmor SWQ1 or SWQ2 (each A, SW band, R); RF choke (short-wave);
OC170, OC71, 2 x OA81; earpiece.
    5: Making a Two-Valve Short-Wave Receiver -
    Powered by mains unit, Chap. 7 (below).


Ply chassis with slotted floor and front panel (foil-covered), or metal chassis;
Denco Green series coils (A, SW band, R);
EF89, EL84; output transformer, speaker.
    6: The Three-Valve Short-Wave Receiver -
    Use of RF stage before detector stage for receiving Morse
    (set oscillating).
    Two designs using RF, detector and AF stages.
    Davey presents the first for interest only, as it has an
    unselective first stage, and advises readers to pass
    to second design, which uses ganged tuning of RF and
    detector stages:




    (As Chap. 5, 1st edition.)







Outline layout only, implies metal chassis;
RF stage: Osmor SWQ1 and/or SWQ2 (each A, SW band);
Detector: Osmor SWQ1 and/or SWQ2 (each pri, sec, R)
SW choke;
DF91/92/96, DF91/92/96, 1.4v audio pentode;
headphones.
    7: Mains Power Units and Amplifiers -
    Note regretting disappearance of silent-background 2-volt valves.
    Power Supply for Mains Valves:




    Newmarket PC106 Transistor Power Unit:

    International Rectifier Corp. Transistor Power Unit:


    Simple Two-Valve Mains Amplifier:
    Two-Valve Amplifier with Optional neg. feedback:
    Mullard 3-3 or Sinclair Z12 amps cited as alternatives.
    (Revision of Chap. 6, 1st edition.)


Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Mains transformer 250-0-250v 80mA, 5v 2A, 6.3v 3A;
5Z4; 2 x smoothing chokes 80mA.
Optional potential divider shown for powering battery valves
(LT from battery).
Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Optional additioal smoothing shown for Sinclair Z12 amp.
Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Note on making up equivalent unit with untapped
transformer secondary and bridge circuit (4 rectifiers).
EF86, EL84; output transformer, speaker.
6J7, 6V6; output transformer, speaker.



    8: Building a Three-Valve All-Mains Receiver -
    Other ways of receiving Morse, including superhet and BFO.
    Three-valver (RF, detector, AF), supplied by
    power pack from Chap. 7:





    (Revision of Chap. 7, 1st edition.)



Outline layout only, metal chassis and front panel, with
under-chassis screen between RF and detector stages;
RF stage: Osmor SWQ1 and/or SWQ2 (each A, SW band);
Detector: Osmor SWQ1 and/or SWQ2 (each pri, sec, R);
2 x RF choke (short-wave);
6J7, 6J7, 6V6, or EF89, EF89, EL84;
Output transformer, speaker.
    9: A Transistor Short-Wave Superhet Receiver -
    (Based on Repanco design; similar to Pegasus
    receiver - see BOP, July and October 1966.)



    Transistor Superhet RF Stage:
Metal chassis;
Repanco coils XTA31*, XSA34*, XSA37*, XOT33, XOS36;
IFTs Repanco XT50-1, XT50-2, XT50-3;
OC170 or OC169, OC45 or AF117, OC45 or AF117, OC81D,
2 x OC81 matched, OA81;
Repanco driver transformer TT55, output transformer TT56, speaker.
Repanco XSF38, XSF35, XTF32, and 3 coils * above; OC170.
    10: An Easy-to-Build Short-Wave Superhet Receiver -
    Five-Valve Superhet Receiver:









    BFO unit to add to above:
    Suggestions for introducing feedback as alternative to BFO.
    (Revision of Chap. 10, 1st edition.)

Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Metal chassis, with screening between aerial and osc. coils;
Aerial coils: Osmor QA2, QA3, QA4;
Osc coil: Osmor QO2, QO3, QO4;
2 x IFT: Osmor 465kHz, pre-aligned, or 455kHz if to match BFO;
6K8, 6K7, 6J7, 6V6, 5Z4 (Octal), or
ECH81, EF85 or EF89, EBC81, EL84, EZ80 (B9A);
output transformer, speaker;
mains transformer 250-0-250v 80mA, 5v 1A, 6.3v 2A;
smoothing choke.
Eddystone BFO coil, 455kHz; 6J7.



        Mention of AR88, R1155 and new sets by Codar.
    Communications Receiver design:













Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Aerial coils: Osmor QA2, QA3, QA4, QA8;
Mixer coils: Osmor QHF2, QHF3, QHF4, QHF8;
Osc coils: Osmor QO2, QO3, QO4, QO8;
IFTs x 3: Osmor 470kc/s pre-aligned;
EF89 (RF), ECH81 (Freq. ch), EF89 (IF), EF89 (IF),
EBC81 (Det, AVC, amp), EL84 (o/p), EF80 (BFO),
EB91 (diode noise limiter), EZ80 (rect);
output transformer, speaker;
mains transformer 250-0-250v 100mA, 6.3v 1A, 6.3v 3A;
smoothing choke 100mA.
    12: Aerials and Earths for Short Waves -
    Useful short-wave aerial lengths; aerials for restricted
    spaces; earthing methods; warning not to earth to gas pipe.
    (Revision of Chap. 11, 1st edition.)
-




    13: Commercial Receivers and Kits of Parts; Buying Components -
    Codar CR45 receiver; Mullard 3-3 amplifier;
    HAC one-valver; Sinclair Micro FM.
-



    14: Appendix -
    Addresses of suppliers (now obsolete).
 
-
1979
Fun with Short Wave Radio

3rd edition
  Like many of the later Kaye & Ward editions and titles, the third edition of Fun with Short Wave Radio appeared in a smaller format than the first two, with smaller print and, sadly, some diagrams and other details omitted.   These omissions might not have been serious for the experienced constructor, but must have led to many queries from novices.   Chapter order is almost identical to that for the second edition.

    Foreword -
    Jack Cox notes rise in interest in hobby from girls,
    and inclusion of radio in Scout training programme as
    exemplified in Jamborees of 1975 and 1978-9.
-




    Symbols and Abbreviations
-
    1: Introduction to Short Waves -
    Development of transistors for HF work noted;
    Changes over years in definition of "short waves";
    wavelength-frequency relationship; variations in propagation
    conditions with frequency, solar activity and time of day;
    country prefixes; time zones; tools; recommended books.
    (Repeat of Chap. 1, 2nd edition.)
-







    2: Amateur Radio -
    The RSGB - history and what it offers;
    PMG licence for transmitting; short-wave bands -
    uses and characteristics; reception report codes;
    international Q code; abbreviations; Morse code.
    (Repeat of Chap. 2, 2nd edition.)
-






    3: Battery One-Valve Receivers -
    General construction and usage hints given throughout chapter.

    One-Valve Battery Short-Wave Receiver:
    (As Chap. 3, 2nd edition, but Denco coil(s) substituted.)





    The HAC One-Valver (kit described):



3-ply or hardboard chassis, slotted floor,
with front panel, foil-covered;
Coils: Denco 30-10MHz and/or 12-4.5MHz (each A, SW band, R),
switched if desired, but circuit and layout no longer give
guidance (one coil only shown);
1.4-volt pentode, e.g.
DF91, DF92, DF96, 1T4, 1F1, 1F2; headphones.
Uses AR8 (2v) with 3v LT supply dropped to 2V.
    4: Battery Valve and Transistor Receivers -
    1-valver using 6.3-volt valve, heater powered by "lantern"
    battery (similar to design a) in Chap. 4, 2nd edition.):




    Battery (valve) amplifier (as Chap. 4, 2nd edition.):

    Transistor Experimental Receiver (as Chap. 4, 2nd edition.):





Slotted chassis as Chap. 3;
Osmor SWQ1 and SWQ2 (each A, SW band, R) switched if desired
(reader is referred to previous chapter for connections and
switching details, but finds Denco details as noted above);
6J7 or 6J7G (Octal), or EF80 or EF85 or EF89 (B9A); headphones.
Built on to chassis of set a);
DL96 with separate LT supply; headphones.
No layout drawing;
Osmor SWQ1 or SWQ2 (each A, SW band, R); RF choke (short-wave);
OC170, OC71, 2 x OA81; earpiece.
    5: Making a Two-Valve Short-Wave Receiver -
    Powered by mains unit, Chap. 7 (below).
    (As Chap. 5, 2nd edition.)
Ply chassis with slotted floor and front panel (foil-covered), or metal chassis;
Denco Green series coils (A, SW band, R);
EF89, EL84; output transformer, speaker.
    6: The Three-Valve Short-Wave Receiver -
    Use of RF stage before detector stage for receiving Morse
    (set oscillating).
    Two designs using RF, detector and AF stages.
    Davey presents the first for interest only, as it has an
    unselective first stage, and advises readers to pass
    to second design, which uses ganged tuning of RF and
    detector stages:




    (As Chap. 6, 2nd edition, but with re-specified coils.)







Outline layout only, implies metal chassis;
RF stage: Denco Blue series (each A, SW band);
Detector: Denco Green series (each pri, sec, R)
SW choke;
DF91/92/96, DF91/92/96, 1.4v audio pentode;
headphones.
    7: Mains Power Units and Amplifiers -
    Note regretting disappearance of silent-background 2-volt valves.
    Power Supply for Mains Valves:




    Newmarket PC106 Transistor Power Unit:

    International Rectifier Corp. Transistor Power Unit:


    Simple Two-Valve Mains Amplifier:
    Two-Valve Amplifier with Optional neg. feedback:
    Mullard 3-3 or Stirling SS110 amps cited as alternatives.
    (Substantially as Chap. 7, 2nd edition.)


Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Mains transformer 250-0-250v 80mA, 5v 2A, 6.3v 3A;
5Z4; 2 x smoothing chokes 80mA.
Optional potential divider described (but no circuit this edition) for
powering battery valves (LT from battery).
Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Optional additioal smoothing shown for Sinclair Z12 amp.
Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Note on making up equivalent unit with untapped
transformer secondary and bridge circuit (4 rectifiers).
EF86, EL84; output transformer, speaker.
6J7, 6V6; output transformer, speaker.



    8: Building a Three-Valve All-Mains Receiver -
    Other ways of receiving Morse, including superhet and BFO.
    Three-valver (RF, detector, AF), supplied by
    power pack from Chap. 7:





    (As Chap. 7, 2nd edition, but with re-specified coils.)



Outline layout only, metal chassis and front panel, with
under-chassis screen between RF and detector stages;
RF stage: Denco Blue series (each A, SW band);
Detector: Denco Green series (each pri, sec, R);
2 x RF choke (short-wave);
6J7, 6J7, 6V6, or EF89, EF89, EL84;
Output transformer, speaker.
    9: A Transistor Short-Wave Superhet Receiver -
    (Based on Repanco design; similar to Pegasus
    receiver - see BOP, July and October 1966.)



    Transistor Superhet RF Stage:
    (Substantially as Chap. 9, 2nd edition.)
Metal chassis;
Repanco coils XTA31*, XSA34*, XSA37*, XOT33, XOS36;
IFTs Repanco XT50-1, XT50-2, XT50-3;
OC170 or OC169, OC45 or AF117, OC45 or AF117, OC81D,
2 x OC81 matched, OA81;
Repanco driver transformer TT55, output transformer TT56, speaker.
Repanco XSF38, XSF35, XTF32, and 3 coils * above;
OC170 or OC169.
    10: An Easy-to-Build Short-Wave Superhet Receiver -
    Five-Valve Superhet Receiver:









    BFO unit to add to above:
    Suggestions for introducing feedback as alternative to BFO.
    (Substantially as Chap. 10, 2nd edition.)

Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Metal chassis, with screening between aerial and osc. coils;
Aerial coils: Osmor QA2, QA3, QA4;
Osc coil: Osmor QO2, QO3, QO4;
2 x IFT: 465kHz, pre-aligned, or to match BFO;
6K8, 6K7, 6J7, 6V6, 5Z4 (Octal), or
ECH81, EF85 or EF89, EBC81, EL84, EZ80 (B9A);
output transformer, speaker;
mains transformer 250-0-250v 80mA, 5v 1A, 6.3v 2A;
smoothing choke.
BFO coil not specified; 6J7 or EF89.



    11: The Communications Receiver -
    Mention of AR88, R1155, and Codar CR70A.
    Heathkit Short-Wave Receiver SW-717G:
    (Revision of Chap. 11, 2nd edition.)


Heathkit's schematic shown, with some component values.


    12: Aerials and Earths for Short Waves -
    Useful short-wave aerial lengths; aerials for restricted
    spaces; earthing methods; warning not to earth to gas pipe.
    (As Chap. 12, 2nd edition.)
-




    13: Commercial Receivers and Kits of Parts; Buying Components -
    Other sets by Codar: Mini Clipper, Multiband 6;
    Radio Exchange Ltd Roamer 10 RK3;
    Ambit International kits and components;
    Stirling Sound (Bi-Pre-Pak) modules.
    (Revision of Chap. 13, 2nd edition.)
-






    14: Appendix -
    Addresses of suppliers (now obsolete).
-

    Fun with Electronics, 1st edition: Edmund Ward Ltd; 2nd edition: Kaye & Ward Ltd.
Edition:   Chapter/design: Construction and key components:
Coils: A = aerial winding;
          MW = medium wave winding;
          LW = long wave winding;
          SW = short wave winding;
          R = reaction or reflex winding


1962
Fun with Electronics

1st edition
  Valves predominate in this book, both in terms of projects (only one transistor design) and in the equipment recommended or mentioned.   Alongside the electronic and valve theory offered in the introductory chapter, the book serves to raise awareness of what is available.
    Foreword -
    Jack Cox refers to Davey's continual postbag of queries, all
    answered with clear and detailed advice.
    A page of circuit symbols follows - essentially as drawn by
    R Barnard Way for Fun with Radio, 1st edition, and
    containing no transistor symbols.
-






    1: Introduction to Electronics -
    Davey quotes Encyclopedia Britannica definition of electronics.
    Sets out stall: mix of Davey designs, kits and ready-built items.
    Basic atomic theory; the electron.
    Circuit for measuring a Valve's Characteristics:






DL91, Milliammeter (20mA fsd), 1 or 2 voltmeters,
grid bias, LT and HT batteries.
    2: Radio - the Home-Constructor's 1-valve Battery Receiver -
    Essentially the Beginner's One-Valver, with basic theory of
    operation given.   Reaction capacitor given as .0003μF
    compared with the usual .0001μF.
    See THE BEGINNER'S 1-VALVER.
Hardboard baseboard on side runners; hardboard front panel;
Teletron D/R coil (A, MW, R); DF91 or DF96.




    3: Kit Sets and Car Radios -
    Snags of VHF reception - Davey (having had indifferent early
    results with VHF) trusts that difficulties will soon be resolved.
    Pre-aligned kits (solving alignment problems for constructors):
    Jason FMT 1 and FMT 3, Daystrom and Heathkit FM tuners.
    Transistor designs include Heathkit UXR1 personal portable
    and UJR1 beginner's radio.
    Car radios:
    Philips G82VT hybrid design using low voltage valves
    (12.6v HT and LT).
-










    4: Short Waves and the Construction of an All-Wave Receiver -
    Short-wave spectrum and uses of short waves discussed.
    Reminder of need for a licence to operate a transmitter.
    Safety precautions with mains electricity, and
    advice not to use headphones with mains-operated sets.
    Mains-operated all-wave receiver:
    detector-with-reaction, audio amp, rectifier.










Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Metal chassis, or wood/hardboard and foil (layout drawings given);
Denco Maxi-Q coils, green octal;
EF91, EL84, EZ80; output transformer, speaker;
Mains transformer 250v primary, 250-0-250v 60mA, 6.3v 1A, 6.3v 2A.
Optional bandspread, tone and volume controls.
    5: Amplifiers: A Simple 2-valve Amplifier -
    (2-valve amp for crytal pickup, with no
    negative feedback or tone controls):


Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Metal chassis (circuit and layout drawings given);
ECL82, EZ80; output transformer, speaker;
Mains transformer 250v primary, 250-0-250v 60mA, 6.3v 1A, 6.3v 2A.
    6: Amplifiers and Loudspeakers: High-Fidelity and
        Commercial Designs -
    Davey notes importance of personal preferences,
    room acoustics and remembering to enjoy the music.
    Books by G A Briggs recommended.
    Recommended loudspeaker units include Wharfedale
    3-speaker system and 10" Bronze FSB, and
    Whiteley "Stentorian" units.
    Amplifiers - Leak TL/12 Plus, and Lowther high power
    transistor amplifier mentioned as recently introduced.
    Use of pre-amplifier for tone and volume control,
    equalisation and input selection.
-












    7: Amplifiers and Loudspeakers: Home Construction and
        a Stereophonic Design -
    Davey recommends Mullard book Circuits for Audio Amplifiers,
    which includes 3-watt (3-3) and 10-watt (5-10) amplifiers.
    Basic stereo theory discussed.
    Stereo amplifier (based on Chapter 5 circuit,
    with negative feedback):





    Pre-amplifier using ECC83 suggested (no details), or
    Baxandall design (Wireless World Diary).






Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Circuit and simple layout drawing;
Metal chassis (no size given) and group boards, with
metal screen between amplifier sections;
2 x ECL82, EZ80; 2 x output transformers, 2 x speakers;
Mains transformer 250v primary, 250-0-250v 60mA, 6.3v 1A, 6.3v 2A.



    8: Records and Record Players -
    Fun with Records and Amplifiers title promised.
    (This title never appeared, but Fun with Hi-Fi
    appeared in 1973 - see below.)
    Several record players recommended, including
    Argosy AP11, Magnavox Radiogram, Dansette (J & D Margolin),
    and Philips Auto-Mignon 7" player for cars.
    Several record decks and pickups mentioned.
-








    9: Tape Recorders and Their Uses -
    Davey summarises development of tape recorders (including his
    experience in post-war Berlin when American friends used a
    captured German wire recorder), to modern uses including video.
    Mullard tape amplifier and pre-amp designs mentioned.
    Tape decks mentioned include Garrard " magazine" deck, and
    oddities such as the Gramdeck.
-







    10: Electronic Applications: Suggested Ideas -
    Baby Alarm:


    Guitar, ukulele or zither:
    (developed more fully, with transistor push-pull
    amplifier, in Boy's Own Paper,April 1964)

Circuit, but no constructional suggestions;
Crystal microphone; 4 x OC70, OC71, Red Spot or similar;
output transformer, speaker.
Transducer made from magnet and coils of headphone, with
notched bridge for strings carried on brass/stalloy armature.


    11: Electronics in Industry, the Services, Science and Education -
    Importance of the electronics industry for exports.
    Rise of reliable computers using transistors.
    Survey of electronics in the services, science and
    medicine, and education.
    Mechtronics practical electronics course
    (Clarke Smith/Griffin & George Ltd): 22 experiments
-







    Appendix -
    Book list, and
    addresses of suppliers (now obsolete).

-
1972
Fun with Electronics

2nd edition
  Since publication of the first edition in 1962, two editions of Fun with Transistors had appeared, and Davey refers readers to these and to radio periodicals for transistor radio designs.   There is still only one "Davey design" in this book using transistors; all other projects are either valve-based or recommendations for ready-made equipment.

    Foreword -
    Jack Cox explains Davey's history as Radio Correspondent
    of the Boy's Own Paper (closed since publication
    of the 1st edition), and as contributor to the (then still
    extant) Boy's Own Annual.
    The circuit symbol diagram now includes transistors.
-






    1: Introduction to Electronics -
    Advances of computers and integrated monolithic circuits.
    High-Fidelity - compact amplifiers and loudspeakers.
    Rise of VHF, stereo and local stations.
    Increasing difficulty of buying discrete components,
    especially coils; rise of modular kits.
    Britannica definition of electronics, brief atomic theory.
    Circuit for measuring a Valve's Characteristics:
    (As Chap.1, 1st edition)







DL91, Milliammeter (20mA fsd), 1 or 2 voltmeters,
grid bias, LT and HT batteries.
    2: Radio: the Home Constructor's One-valve Battery Receiver -



    (Substantially as Chap. 2, 1st edition, but with
    alternatives for Teletron coil)
Circuit and layout show Teletron D/R coil, but alternatives given as below.
Hardboard baseboard on side runners; hardboard front panel;
Teletron D/R coil (A, MW, R), or
Repanco DRR2 (MW tapped, LW, R, connections given), or
home-made coil on 1 1/2" former (A, MW, R);
DF91 or DF96.
    3: Kit Sets and Car Radios -
    Reservations in 1st edition regarding FM broadcasting
    largely dropped, but DIY alignment difficulties remain.
    Recommended equipment includes:
    Pre-aligned modules, Martin Electronics Ltd.
    Sinclair 5-watt integrated amplifier and pre-amplifier.
    Mullard Unilex module and control unit.
    Heathkit (Daystrom) kits and ready-made equipment.
    Car radios now all-transistor.
-









    4: Short waves and the construction of an All-Wave receiver -
    Short-wave spectrum and uses of short waves discussed.
    Reminder of need for a licence to operate a transmitter.
    Safety precautions with mains electricity, and
    advice not to use headphones with mains-operated sets.
    Mains-operated all-wave receiver:
    detector-with-reaction, audio amp, rectifier.



    (As Chap 4, 1st edition)





Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Metal chassis, or wood/hardboard and foil (layout drawings given);
Denco Maxi-Q coils, green octal;
EF91, EL84, EZ80; output transformer, speaker;
Mains transformer 250v primary, 250-0-250v 60mA, 6.3v 1A, 6.3v 2A.
Optional bandspread, tone and volume controls.
    5: Amplifiers: A Simple Two-Valve Amplifier -
    (2-valve amp for crytal pickup, with no
    negative feedback or tone controls):
    (As Chap 5, 1st edition)
Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Metal chassis (circuit and layout drawings given);
ECL82, EZ80; output transformer, speaker;
Mains transformer 250v primary, 250-0-250v 60mA, 6.3v 1A, 6.3v 2A.
    6: Amplifiers and Loudspeakers: High-Fidelity and
        Commercial Designs -
    Same loudspeaker units as 1st edition still recommended.
    New equipment mentioned includes -
    Leak Stereofetic transistor FM tuner;
    Leak stereo 30 Plus amplifier;
    Pre-amplifiers discussed briefly.
    Cabinet design for Rank Wharfedale Super 8 RS/DD:










Dimensioned drawing;
1/2" plywood or chipboard; internal absorbent material,
e.g. carpet felt, cellulose wadding or cotton wool.
    7: Amplifiers and Loudspeakers: Home Construction and
        a Stereophonic Design -
    Davey again recommends Mullard book
    Circuits for Audio Amplifiers; stereo theory discussed.
    Stereo amplifier (based on Chapter 5 circuit,
    with negative feedback):




    (Stereo amplifier as Chap 7, 1st edition)





Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Circuit and simple layout drawing;
Metal chassis (no size given) and group boards, with
metal screen between amplifier sections;
2 x ECL82, EZ80; 2 x output transformers, 2 x speakers;
Mains transformer 250v primary, 250-0-250v 60mA, 6.3v 1A, 6.3v 2A.
    8: Records and Record Players -
    Recommended equipment includes -
    BSR McDonald MP60 deck;
    Garrard Laboratory Series Type A;
    Acos ceramic cartridge
-





    9: Tape Recorders and their Uses -
    Mention of imminent launch of Philips video recorder.
    (Essentially as Chap 9, 1st edition)
-



    10: Electronic Applications: Suggested Ideas -
    Baby Alarm:


    Guitar, ukulele or zither:
    (Developed more fully, with transistor push-pull
    amplifier, in Boy's Own Paper,April 1964)
    (As Chap 10, 1st edition)

Circuit, but no constructional suggestions;
Crystal microphone; 4 x OC70, OC71, Red Spot or similar;
output transformer, speaker.
Transducer made from magnet and coils of headphone, with
notched bridge for strings carried on brass/stalloy armature.



    11: More Electronic Devices and Uses of Electronics -
    Veroboard, and Vero-designed
    transistor amplifier mentioned;
    TV aerial amplifiers;
    Electric motor variable speed control units;
    Electronic organs, eg Hammond Piper Autochord;
    Mullard educational materials.
-







    Appendix -
    Book list, and
    addresses of suppliers (now obsolete).
-

    Fun with Transistors, 1st edition: Edmund Ward Ltd; 2nd edition: Kaye & Ward Ltd.
Edition:   Chapter/design: Construction and key components:
Coils: A = aerial winding;
          MW = medium wave winding;
          LW = long wave winding;
          SW = short wave winding;
          R = reaction or reflex winding


1964
Fun with Transistors,

1st edition
  Davey's first transistor designs had appeared in Boy's Own Paper as long as seven years prior to Fun with Transistors first appearing.   To some extent it thus served the same purpose as had the first edition of Fun with Radio, in gathering together and making available some of the transistor designs that had appeared in BOP.

    Foreword by Jack Cox -
    Cox assures readers that transistors are not difficult
    to master, and declares that no enthusiast can be up
    to date without a sound working knowledge of them.
    The page of circuit symbols that follows - essentially
    as drawn by R Barnard Way for Fun with Radio,
    1st edition, contains no transistor symbols.
    Abbreviations and multipliers.
-








    1: Transistors: What They Are and What They Do -
    Davey relates the long search for a "cold valve", mentioning
    experiments leading to development of the transistor
    by Bardeen and Brattain in 1948, point-contact and junction
    transistors, advantages of small size, low power and reliability,
    and comparison with function of triode valve.
    Recommended books for transistor theory -
    Transistors Work Like This, Egon Lasson;
    Principles of Semiconductors, M G Scroggie;
    Mullard Reference Manual of Transistor Circuits.
-










    2: Introduction to Transistor Radio Receivers -
    Davey surveys receivers to be covered in later chapters,
    and covers practicalities such as polarity, care in bending
    wires, heat shunts, etc.
-




    3: A Simple Transistor Receiver -


    (First published in BOP, November 1963)
Paxolin panel; 2 x 4-way tag strips;
homebrew coil on ferrite rod (MW with 2 tappings, LW optional);
OA81, OC71 or OC72; earphone or personal earpiece.
"Lady Jayne" hair grip idea mentioned for heat sink.
    4: A Pocket Transistor Receiver for Use with a Personal Earphone -


    (First published in BOP, December 1963)
Poor diagram of coil; point to point wiring instructions given.
Plastics case; Paxolin panel;
homebrew coil on ferrite rod (MW tapped, R); RF choke;
OC44, 2 x OA81, OC71; crystal earpiece.
    5: How a Loudspeaker Can Be Added to Earlier Designs -
    Notes on selectivity, aerial length, and use of aerial trimmer.
    Three Dee crystal circuit by Repanco, with band-pass circuit
    using 2 x DRR2 coils and diode for feeding audio amplifier.
    Loudspeaker for Chap. 4 receiver:








Additional stage described using OC72 and output transformer,
or 75-ohm speaker;
alternatively use first stage + 2 diodes, to feed amplifier
described in Chap. 8.
    6: Commercial Transistor Kits -
    Kits mentioed include -
    Solderless kit fo 8-transistor radio,
    Electronic Precision Equipment Ltd;
    "Contessa" using pre-made board, Clyne Radio;
    Ranger III, Henrys Radio Ltd;
    Beta II, with PC board, Lasky's Radio
    Kits by Daystrom Ltd.
-








    7: Transistor Superheterodyne Receivers -
    Advantages of superhet design, practical for home
    constructor if allied with alignment service.
    Osmor Transistor Superhet described, circuit
    given, no values.
    Also mentioned: the PW Transistorised Pocket Superhet,
    (Practical Wireless design using Osmor coils).
-







    8: Transistor Audio Amplifiers -
    Micro-amp kit, Sinclair Radionics Ltd,
    Circuit given, no values. (Davey admits to having
    some difficulty with this kit, having been used
    to larger-scale components!)
    200mW push-pull amplifier (practical layout by Davey) from
    Mullard Reference Manual of Transistor Circuits:










Complete details given, including table relating speaker impedance,
feedback resistor value and output transformer ratio.
OC71, OC71, 2 x OC72;
driver transformer, output transformer; speaker.
    9: Commercial Receivers Using Transistors -
    General comments - same set appears in different guises;
    sets from pocket size to table models.
    Features - wood v plastic case, carrynig case, car aerial
    socket, telexcopic aerial for FM.
    Several sets described and illustrated, including -
    Ferranti Pixie "very handy for listening to the Test
    Match scores in school!";
    Ferguson 3102 c/w watch movement to turn receiver on;
    Short-wave receivers especially useful for overseas
    listeners whose local programmes are on short-wave.
-











    10: Transistor Short-Wave Receivers -
    Ready-made receivers - Sobell S314 (also MW and LW).
    Alloy diffused junction transistors for high frequencies,
    e.g. Mullard OC170, OC171 (< 70MHz); AF114 (< 100MHz).
    Short-wave receiver for advanced constructors
    using Chap. 4 circuit as basis:


    Codar Kits -
    Mini-Clipper, valve detector + optional 2-transistor amplifier.
    Also Clipper and Super Clipper.
    Usual warning concerning need for licence to transmit.





Adjust tuning capacitor value and use slow-motion dial;
substitute small variable capacitor for reflex trimmer, mounted beside
tuning capacitor; adjust no of turns on coil; use short-wave RF choke.





    11: A Transistor Oscillator for Practising Morse Code -
    Kit by Henrys Radio described:



Circuit given; no constructional details;
Audio transistor (not specified); output transformer, speaker; Morse key.
    12: Battery Eliminators for Operating Transistor Receivers
        from the Electricity Mains -


    Also mentioned: AC eliminator/battery charger by Eagle Products.

Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Davey recommends this unit for sets with loudspeakers only.
Mains transformer with secondary 6.3v 1A; 2 x OA81.


    13: Modern Applications of Transistors -
    Survey of modern devices including hearing-aids, medical
    applications, computing, TV cameras, TV sets including
    portasbles, radio microphones, suitcase outside broadcast
    outfit, radio cameras and spacecraft.
    Davey encourages readers to consider a career in electronics.
-






    Appendix -
    Book list, and
    addresses of suppliers (now obsolete).
-



1971
Fun with Transistors,

2nd edition
  Many of the BOP transistor designs were repeated, but a feature of this edition is a modular approach to building a transistor superhet receiver, including a choice of transistor audio amplifiers.

    Foreword -
    Jack Cox introduces the book's series of progressive
    transistor designs.
    Circuit symbols page still contains no transistor symbols.
    Abbreviations and multipliers.
-





    1: Transistors: What They Are and What They Do -
    Davey notes the near-eclipse of valves, and the rise
    in use, availability, and types of transistors.
    Historical survey and comparison with the triode valve,
    and book recommendations as 1st edition.
-





    2: Introduction to Transistor Radio Receivers -
    Davey surveys receivers to be covered in later chapters,
    and covers practicalities such as polarity, care in bending
    wires, heat shunts, etc.
    (Substantially as Chap. 2, 1st edition)
-





    3: A Simple Transistor Receiver -


    (As Chap. 3, 1st edition)
Paxolin panel; 2 x 4-way tag strips;
homebrew coil on ferrite rod (MW with 2 tappings, LW optional);
OA81, OC71 or OC72; earphone or personal earpiece.
"Lady Jayne" hair grip idea mentioned for heat sink.
    4: A Pocket Transistor Receiver for Use with a Personal Earphone -


    (As Chap. 4, 1st edition)
Poor diagram of coil; point to point wiring instructions given.
Plastics case; Paxolin panel;
homebrew coil on ferrite rod (MW tapped, R); RF choke;
OC44, 2 x OA81, OC71; crystal earpiece.
    5: A Simple RF and Detector Unit -
    Davey introduces modular construction for receivers.
    Z12, Z30 and IC10 amplifiers, Sinclair Radionics Ltd;
    Other kits, Home Radio and Electroniques Ltd.
    RF and Detector Unit:








Circuit and layout given.
Small group board, 2 x 4-way, or Veroboard;
Coil on ferrite rod, as Chap. 4 (MW, R used as coupler);
BC108, OA81.
    6: A Superhet Tuning Module -
    Alignment issues discussed.
    Pre-aligned VHF receiver kit, Martin Electronics Ltd.
    MW/LW superhet tuning module using pre-aligned coils:








Circuit and layout given.
Eyelet board;
Repanco FS30 ferrite rod aerial (MW, LW);
Repanco XO28 oscillator coil;
AF117; rotary switch, 3-pole 2-way.
    7: The Intermediate Frequency Module -



    Importance of good soldering technique stressed.
Circuit and layout given.
Eyelet board;
Repanco XT50/1, XT50/2, XT50/3, IF Transformers, 465KHz;
2 x AF117; 2 x OA79 or OA81.


    8: Transistor Audio Amplifiers using Transformers -
    Mullard 200mW push-pull design (as Chap.8, 1st edition);
    practical layout by Davey:



    Mullard 1W design (also used in short-wave superhet
    described in Fun with Short Waves, 2nd & 3rd editions):





Complete details given, including table relating speaker impedance,
feedback resistor value and output transformer ratio.
OC71, OC71, 2 x OC72;
Rex LT44 driver transformer, Rex LT700 output transformer; speaker.

Circuit and layout given.
Group board; OC81D, 2 x OC81 (matched);
Repanco driver transformer TT55, output trans TT56; 3Ω speaker.
    9: Transistor Audio Amplifiers without Transformers -
    Hi-fi quality possible with transformer-less designs;
    worth using good speakers.   Recommended units -
    Wharfedale Bronze RS/DD; Super 8 RS/DD.
    For cabinets - leaflet from Rank Wharfedale,
    or books by G A Briggs.
    Mullard 500mW design:


    Mullard 1.2 watt design:









Circuit and layout given.
Group board, Veroboard or paxolin panel;
AC128, AC128, AC127 (npn).
Circuit and layout given.
Group board, Veroboard or paxolin panel;
AC127 (npn), AC128, AC128, AC127 (npn).
    10: Transistor Superheterodyne Receivers -
    Non-superhet receivers -
    lack of selectivity, but no alignment problems.
    Superhet kits from Heathkit (Daystrom) or Henrys Radio Ltd.
    Typical superhet circuit shown (no values).
    Receiver from modules described in Chapters 6 - 9:
    Choice of amplifier from Chapters 8 and 9, and of
    speaker/cabinet, determines type of set from portable to hi-fi.





Tuning Module (Chap. 6); IF Module (Chap.7);
amplifier from Chapters 8 or 9; speaker; cabinet.


    11: Transistor Short-Wave Receivers -
    Alloy diffused junction transistors for high frequencies,
    e.g. Mullard OC170, OC171 (< 70MHz); AF114 (< 100MHz).
    Short-wave receiver for advanced constructors
    using Chap. 4 circuit as basis:


    Transistor short-wave superhet - reader referred to
    Fun with Short Wave Radio, Chap. 9.
    Codar Kits -
    Mini-Clipper, valve detector + optional 2-transistor amplifier.
    Also Clipper and Super Clipper.
    Usual warning concerning need for licence to transmit.
    (Revision of Chap. 10, 1st edition)




Adjust tuning capacitor value and use slow-motion dial;
substitute small variable capacitor for reflex trimmer, mounted beside
tuning capacitor; adjust no of turns on coil; use short-wave RF choke.








    12: A Transistor Oscillator for Practising Morse Code -
    Kit by Henrys Radio described:
    (As Chap. 11, 1st edition)

Circuit given; no constructional details;
Audio transistor (not specified); output transformer, speaker; Morse key.
    13: Battery Eliminators for Operating Transistor Receivers
        from the Electricity Mains -




    Also mentioned: ready-made power supplies from
    Newmarket Transistors Ltd, Sinclair Radionics and
    Martin Electronics Ltd.
    (Revision of Chap. 12, 1st edition)

Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Davey recommends this unit for sets with loudspeakers only.
Repanco transformer MT/50/1/2, (0.5A), MT/50/1 (1A),or MT/50/2 (2A) -
Output tappings 0, 19, 25, 33, 40, 50v (33 & 40v tappings used);
DD175 (International Rectifier).





    14: Modern Applications of Transistors -
    Survey of modern devices including hearing-aids, transistorised
    fluorescent lamps, radio microphones, suitcase outside broadcast
    outfit, radio cameras and spacecraft.
    Davey encourages readers to consider a career in electronics.
    (Revision of Chap. 13, 1st edition)
-






    Appendix -
    Book list, and
    addresses of suppliers (now obsolete).
-

    Fun with Hi-Fi, Kaye & Ward Ltd.
Edition:   Chapter/design:

Construction and key components:
1973
Fun with Hi-Fi
  Only one edition of this book was published.   Its subject had partly been covered by the two editions of Fun with Electronics that preceded it, but in this book Davey gives essential theory and detailed advice for the enthusiast in search of the best sound his budget will buy.   More of a buyer's guide, with no "Davey designs" as such.

    1: Modern Hi-Fi Sound -
    Brief account of early sound reproduction: Edison, Bell, Berliner.
    Davey sets out purpose of book: how to achieve hi-fi,
    equipment available, mid-fi and stereo.   Reader urged
    to enjoy the music for its own sake.   Hi-fi periodicals, and
     Circuits for Audio Amplifiers.
    Summary of equipment forming a hi-fi reproduction chain.
-







    2: The Growth of Hi-fi -
    Graphs showing audio frequency range, frequency ranges of
    musical instruments, and response curve of a mid-1920s
    intervalve transformer.   Davey describes factors that
    limited sound quality in early radio receivers and electrical
    record reproduction, and the developments during late 1920s
    and 1930s that promised improvement.
    Amplifier circuits shown (including Williamson - no values).
    Post-war developments recounted, including those stimulated
    by launch of the Leak amplifiers.
    Advent of long-playing records, FM broadcasting, and
    transistor-based equipment.
-












    3: The Mullard Amplifiers -
    Extensive quotes from Circuits for Audio Amplifiers (Mullard),
    including definitions, performance criteria for high fidelity,
    and amplifier details as below.
    Mullard 3-3 (3-watt) amplifier:



    Mullard 5-10 (10-watt) amplifier:




    Mullard 3-valve (2-watt) stereo amplifier:








Circuit (most values given), and layout diagrams.
Metal chassis, group board; EF86, EL84, EZ80;
output transformer; speaker;
mains tranformer, secondaries 300-0-300v, 3.15-0-3.15v, 6.3v.
Circuit (most values given), and layout diagrams.
Metal chassis, group boards; EF86, ECC83, EL84, EL84, EZ81;
output transformer, primary centre-tapped or with additional
tappings for ultra-linear operation; speaker;
mains transformer, secondaries 300-0-300v, 3.15-0-3.15v, 6.3v.
Circuit (most values given), and layout diagrams.
Metal chassis, group boards; ECL82, ECL82, EZ80;
2 x output transformers, speakers;
mains transformer, secondaries 250-0-250v, 3.15-0-3.15v, 6.3v.
    4: Modern Hi-Fi Units -
    Reader invited to decide how musical his ear is, and
    thus how high he is aiming in terms of sound quality.
    Davey lists his own musical tastes (including church
    organ music with bass that makes the floor shake),
    and those of Editor Jack Cox.
    Importance of room acoustics, appropriate output power,
    and balance of quality among system components.
    Buying considerations for tuners, amplifiers, receivers,
    turntables, cartridges, loudspeakers and compacts.
-










    5: The Playing Deck and Cartridge -
    Requirements for good performance of turntable, pickup and cartridge.
    Turntables mentioned include BSR Macdonald MP60, Sonab 75S
    and 85S, and units by Leak and Lenco.
    Cartridges mentioned include units by Shure, Goldring and Acos.
-





    6: Radio Tuners -
    Home construction of FM tuners only possible with pre-aligned kits,
    e.g. Heathkit AR2000 receiver - specifications given in full.
    Mention of ready-made tuners and receivers by Armstrong, Leak
    and Goodmans.   Importance of good FM aerial for best results.
-





    7: Modern Amplifiers -
    Transistors dominate modern amplifier design; components
    for valve amplifiers becoming difficult to obtain (1973).
    Consider price, and buy the best that can be afforded,
    but personal preferences are the deciding factor.
    Specifications given for Sonab R7000 receiver, and
    Bush Arena System 5.
    Consider foreign (especially Japanese) equipment too.
-








    8: Loudspeaker and Loudspeaker Assemblies -
    Quote from H J Leak (1957) on importance of speaker housing
    for good results, dual-unit assemblies, adequate housing volume
    for good bass, difficulty of defining a "natural" sound due to
    differences of subjective opinion.
    Quote from Mullard Circuits for Audio Amplifiers regarding
    importance of extended listening to judge loudspeaker quality,
    with a variety of sound types (orchestral, speech),
    use of reflectors or reflecting surfaces in avoiding
    directionality, and advantages of dual-unit assemblies.
    Compact hi-fi possible as a result of compromise,
    and advances in magnet design etc.
    Details and sketches of Goodmans Dimension-8 system,
    illustrating importance of speaker positioning.
-














    9: Build Your Own Hi-Fi - Tuners and Amplifiers -
    Be content with "mid-fi" at first.
    FM tuners - pre-aligned kits again recommended.
    Loft-mounted FM Aerial - dipole and reflector:

    Valve amplifiers - building the Mullard designs still worthwhile
    if components can be obtained, and provides good experience.
    Transistor amplifiers - kits by Heathkit, Mullard Unilex, or
    Sinclair Radionics.   Consider circuits published in Mullard
    booklet Transistor Audio and Radio Circuits, and periodicals.



Dimensioned drawing given, with advice on orientation.
Wooden H-frame; aluminium rod or copper pipe; 75Ω cable.






    10: Build Your Own Hi-Fi - Loudspeaker Cabinets -
    Davey recalls that at school he was "not too bright at woodwork"
    but has made many successful enclosures.
    Rank Wharfedale 1 cu ft (distributed port) enclosure for 8" units:



    Speaker kits by Heathkit \nd Goodmans also mentioned.
    Infinite baffle discussed.
    Goodmans 30-litre enclosure for 8" units (option for HF unit):


    Davey Bookshelf ("mid-fi") enclosure:





Dimensioned drawing given, with options for providing vent holes.
1/2" plywood; 1" absorbent material; flannel or melton cloth for rear vents;
front cloth - purpose-made, or domestic fabric tested with white-noise source;
Rank Wharfedale Super 8 RS/DD or 8" Bronze RS/DD.


Dimensioned drawing given.
3/4" plywood or high-density chipboard; 2" fibreglass loft insulation;
Goodmans Twin Axiom 8.
Basic dimensions given.
1/2" chipboard; surgical cotton-wool; 10" x 6" elliptical speaker.
    11: Modern Headphones, and the Future of Hi-Fi -
    Recommended books by G A Briggs, Gordon J King and Percy Wilson.
    Stereo headphones for sense of presence, excellent frequency
    response, and exclusion of domestic distractions.
    Davey sceptical about quadraphonic sound - will humans develop four ears?
-





    Appendix -
    Book list, and
    addresses of suppliers (now obsolete).
-

    Fun with Silicon Chips in Modern Radio, Kaye & Ward Ltd.
Edition:   Chapter/design: Construction and key components:
Coils: A = aerial winding;
          MW = medium wave winding;
          LW = long wave winding;
          SW = short wave winding;
          R = reaction or reflex winding


1981
Fun with Silicon Chips
in Modern Radio
  Only one edition, in the smaller Kaye & Ward format.   The use of monolithic devices with ancillary components offered scope for practical experiment with layout and construction methods.   Davey seemed to relish this chance to present simple chassis-based radios almost as he had done formerly with designs based wholly on discrete components.

    1: Silicon Chips and Transistors: their History and Uses in Radio -
    Development of radio, the thermionic valve, crystals.
    Transistors, PNP and NPN types.   Invention of
    silicon chip; development of integrated circuits.
-




    2: Introduction to Building Radio Receivers -
    CSC breadboard, Veroboard, soldering irons.
    Solder and soldering technique, heat sinks.
    Choice of (passive) components.
    Reading circuit diagrams, theory books.
-





    3: Coils and Components for AM Receivers -
    Scarcity of manufactured coils; aerials and earths.
    Homebrew coil, air-cored:
    Homebrew coil on ferrite:


MW, 2 tappings.
MW, 2 tappings.
    4: Easy-to-make Receivers for Medium Waves -
    Crystal receiver:


    2-transistor pocket receiver:
    First published in BOP, Dec 1963.



Hardboard or plywood panel;
OA91 or similar;
Either coil from Chap. 3; high impedance phones.
Paxolin or hardboard panel; plastic case;
Ferrite coil from Chap. 3, with reflex winding added; RF choke;
OC44 or AF127; OC71 or AC128; 2 x OA81; crystal earpiece.
    5: VHF, FM and Stereo: what they are and why we use them -
    Quality limitations of AM radio; FM and stereo discussed.
    Ambit International 2-stage tuner head, and complete
    receiver with final stages on integrated circuit -
    circuit diagrams and brief description.


No constructional details.



    6: A One-chip Receiver for Medium Waves -
    RF, IF and AF amplification briefly discussed.
    MW Receiver with optional transistor amplifiers:






Hardboard or ply panel;
Homebrew coil on ferrite, MW, LW (optional);
ZN414, crystal earpiece.
Amplifier stages using ZTX300, BC108 or OC71.
    7: Audio Amplifiers Employing Chips -
    Comparison with weight and size of Mullard 5-10.
    Mono audio amplifier:




Blockboard baseboard and ply front panel, circuit itself on Veroboard;
TBA810S or TBA810AS; speaker.
    8: More Audio Amplifiers using ICs -
    Mono audio amplifier:
    Stereo audio amplifier (Sinclair design):
    Mono audio amplifier:
    Mono audio amplifier:

    Stereo preamplifier:
    (with volume, balance, treble and bass controls)

Veroboard; TCA949 with heat sink; speaker.
Basic Veroboard layout given; 2 x TCA940 with heat sinks, speakers.
Schematic only; ULN2283B; speaker.
PCB layout shown, translation to Veroboard or CSC breadboard
suggested; TDA1010 with heat sink; speaker.
Circuit only (no description); 2 x audio transistors (not specified).


    9: Assembling Complete Radio Receivers -
    Crystal diode and chip receiver:

    Two-chip receiver comprising:

    Note on using battery eliminators.

Baseboard and ply panel; either coil from Chap. 3; OA91;
TBA810S amp on Veroboard as Chap. 7; speaker.
One-chip receiver as Chap. 5; ferrite coil from Chap. 3;
TBA810S amp on Veroboard as Chap. 7; speaker.


    10: Loudspeakers to Build or Kits to Buy -
    Books by G A Briggs recommended;
    manufacturers surveyed;
    good results with salvaged units.
    Small home-built enclosure:

    Briggs design for 8" unit described.




1/2" blockboard, finished size 7" x 4" x 13",
with internal shelf, rear vent, damping material.


    11: Battery Eliminators for Mains operation -
    Safety - enclosure essential; isolate before adjusting.
    Choice of mains transformers;
    Mains unit:


Suitable enclosure required for protection from mains.
Mains transformer, 9-0-9v secondary; bridge rectifier 1-2A, 100piv.
    12: Short Waves and Silicon Chips -
    Ferranti superhet front end with IC amp:


    Above circuit adapted for Denco coils:





Circuit only, no constructional details; inductors not specified;
ZTX312; Murata/Ambit SFD455B resonator; ZN414;
audio IC amp, speaker.
Circuit only, no constructional details;
Aerial coil - Denco Blue series; oscillator - Denco Red series;
ZTX312 or BF195; Murata/Ambit SFD455B resonator; ZN414;
audio IC amp, speaker.
    13: Kits Available, and Applications of Silicon Chips -
    Applications in radio control, toys and computers.
    Schematics for TBA820M in audio amps.
    Sinclair ZX80 computer as kit or ready-assembled.
    SN56477 noise generator schematics.


No constructional details for these projects -
for the experienced constructor to work up.


    Appendix -
    Recommended book and peiodicals.
-

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This long page is now substantially complete, but I hope to improve the cross-referencing in the course of time.